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Oct 18, 2007

Comments

Rob Mortimer

Im not a designer, but even I know that you NEVER drop shadow a logo.

Text only when its not very legible without it, and even then you should probably change what is behind it first...

davidthedesigner

What's a drop shadow 'effect' - surely it's either a drop shadow or not a drop shadow?

Ben

Good point David.

vos broekema

Drop shadow is only allowed when meant in a funny way. A logo with drop shadow is funny.

Christa

ahhh, if only my stupid art director agreed with you.

Richard

Forgive me for being pedantic but I'd say it's an "effect" because it's not really a shadow, it's just a simulation of what the loasy little blighter would look like.

jon

depends, for print work, i would never in my wildest dreams use it, but, in the case of my full time job, we shadow tons of shit, its what the client wants to see unfortunately. some examples here: http://www.whitetape.net/wt

playout

Every rule has it's own exception.

c. coy

i try to use a drop shadow in everything i do.

s

Oh, dear. In Singapore, we are asked to drop shadow almost everything. It is truly the most depressing place to be a designer.

Mat

Does this count?
http://www.trcmedia.org/trcmedia/uploads/images/Channel%204%20logo%20drop%20shadow%202007.jpg

Dave C.

Wow, there's all kinds of smug going on in here.

It's complete absurdity to think there there is never, ever a circumstance where a drop shadow adds to a design. This is one of those things the designers say to each other because it's the "cool" thing to say, but in reality, everyone has either used one or will use one in their career.

Please, get over yourselves.

msl

You've obviously never worked in moving image, where I have learnt against my so-thought better judgement that drop shadows have to be used sometimes, gradients come in handy, and every so often the 'lens flare' comes out.

Printing Specialists London

Well, I think that drop shadows can actually be effective if used correctly. The problem is, many people tend to misuse them since they are easy to implement. Examples of bad drop-shadowing are grey shadows on non-white backgrounds and shadows with multiple angles of light.

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